Council satisfaction surveys to guide strategic action

The problem

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Satisfaction surveys are relatively easy to execute but...

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Satisfaction surveys give a large amount of qualitative information, some of it good, some not so good however....

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Councils can't fix everything that scores less than perfectly

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If  Council is going to fix anything, resources should be concentrated on those things that make a difference

 

Step 1 Deciding what makes a difference 

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Councils, like any business need to decide what it is about their business that they want to maximise - this is their strategic outcome

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In the example given this is having 'residents recommending the city as a great place to live'. Councils have different strategic objectives so each survey needs to be customised to reflect this

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A questionnaire is then developed incorporating this and 52 other standard council service dimensions plus others unique to each council

 

Step 2 Developing a Council Decision Model

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Data is collected - usually by telephone. 

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A Council Decision Model is developed statistically. This model shows the limited number of factors that impact on what council wants

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All the factors in the survey are tested, but only those things that impact on the strategic outcome are included in the model

 

 

Step 3 Priority tabulation

 

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A priority tabulation is produced that lists the desired outcome, the critical factors and other factors

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Only those factors that are both critical and rated as unsatisfactory are targeted for action

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All other factors are listed for interest sake but since they do not affect the desired outcome, no action is recommended no matter how low the score.

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This process conserves council resources because it concentrates initiatives on those things that need fixing to achieve council's strategic objectives

 

 

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